42nd Annual Series of Early American Trades and

 

Historic Preservation Workshops

 


 


 

Workshop image

 

To register,
Download this PDF Registration Form
and return it with payment to Eastfield Village.
(The form may be filled out on your computer, saved, and attached to this email: eastfieldvillage@gmail.com )

 

2018
Workshop Schedule

 

1. BRICK FIREPLACE and OVEN BUILDING 1770-1840

June 11-16 (5 days) :: Limit: 8 Students :: Fee: $490.00

This 5-day course begins by providing an in-depth study of the American fireplace and oven through an illustrated lecture of regional types and construction materials. A large collection of original fireplace and oven materials, hardware and fittings are available for examination at Eastfield. Students working in groups of 3 or 4 construct a fireplace and oven using salvaged brick and lime mortar.

Sam McKinney, independent scholar and operator of “Traditional Builder,” Dillsburg PA; John McMillen, Restoration Specialist and Mason, Brewster NY; William McMillen, retired supervisor of restoration, Historic Richmond Town, Staten Island NY



2. BAKING IN EARLY AMERICA

June 22-24 (3 days) :: Limit: 8 students :: Fee: $350.00

Students primarily focus on baking, and reference 'American Cookery' by Amelia Simmons, the first cookbook to be published in America in 1796 utilizing items native to North America - corn, pumpkins, etc. We also include a few of the English cookery books that were in use in America - Hannah Glasse, Elizabeth Raffald, and others. We use various brick wall ovens and bake kettles (also referred to as Dutch ovens) to make a variety of period baked goods - pies and puddings, sweetmeats, small cakes and breads.

Niel De Marino, is a renowned culinary historian; quite at home in the 18th century. Niel is the proprietor of "The Georgian Kitchen", a bakery specializing in period correct baked goods and food items. He has appeared in the PBS series American Experience in the films “John and Abigail Adams” and “Alexander Hamilton.”




3. WINDOW SASH – 18th to EARLY 19th CENTURY

June 27-29 (3 days) :: Limit: 8 students :: Fee: $350.00

Specifically designed for those who wish to learn the construction, restoration and preservation of 18th to early 19th century windows. After an in-depth presentation and survey of types of sash – leaded, casement and double-hung – students examine many actual period examples plus the tools and materials used to construct them. Students will begin to select, cut and shape the various pieces to construct a small four-light sash using hand tools. The use of other tools and equipment for construction are discussed.

Robert Adam, founder and former department chair of Preservation Carpentry, North Bennet School, Boston MA., a working craftsman, and consultant to preservation projects and museums; William McMillen, retired supervisor of restoration, Historic Richmond Town, Staten Island NY, also consultant and working craftsman.



4. 1808 ACCOUTREMENTS

July 5-8 (4 days) :: Limit: 10 students :: Fee: $375.00

In this multi-trades workshop, students learn to build a set of US Army 1808 Accoutrements including the cartridge box and bayonet sling. There is a choice of early (1808) or later (1820’s) variant cartridge box and bayonet sling. One day of the workshop is spent learning basic tinsmithing skills necessary to build the tin tray for the cartridge boxes, with 3 days dedicated to learning the basic leatherworking skills necessary to build the cartridge box and bayonet sling.

Shaun A. Pekar is in independent historic shoemaker, leatherworker and proprietor of “S. Pekar, Shoe and Accoutrement Maker,” a business specializing in 18th and 19th century reproduction leather items.



5. TURN-SLIPPERS, MULES, PANTOUFLES

July 26-29 (4 days) :: Limit: 5 students :: Fee: $400.00

Students learn to construct the versatile and ubiquitous slipper or mule, a staple of indoors footwear for both men and women throughout the 18th century. There is a choice of black calfskin or red morocco leather uppers for the slippers.

Shaun A. Pekar is in independent historic shoemaker, leatherworker and proprietor of “S. Pekar, Shoe and Accoutrement Maker,” a business specializing in 18th and 19th century reproduction leather items.



6. TECHNIQUES FOR DATING HISTORIC STRUCTURES

August 1-3 (3 days) :: Limit: 12 students Fee: $385.00

Participants are guided through the difficult process of recognizing architectural changes made during various periods in the lifespan of a building. They are then taught to identify the specific elements relevant to the dating process. This includes the evolution of molding styles, hardware, window and door treatments, fireplaces, timber framing methods, also tell-tale signs such as saw, hand plane and planer marks. Students gain a good sense of the amount of detective work required to date a pre-1875 structure and will investigate several structures during the class.

William McMillen, consultant, independent scholar, and retired supervisor of restoration at Historic Richmond Town, Staten Island NY; Robert Adam, founder and former department chair of Preservation Carpentry, North Bennet School, Boston MA; Eric Gradoia, Director of Historic Preservation, Historic Deerfield MA.




7. BLACKSMITHING

August 10 – 12 (3 days) :: Limit: 6 students :: Fee: $375.00

Course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic tools and processes of blacksmithing. Through a series of practical projects, skill development in such techniques as drawing out, upsetting, bending, twisting, and other forming methods are covered as well as more advanced subjects such as welding, brazing, and the heat treating of carbon steel for edged tools. The remaining time will be devoted to small projects of the student's choice.

Olof Jansson, blacksmith for over 30 years, has specialized in making items for museums and historic sites in the Mohawk Valley and Capital District of N Y State.




8. TIN I: Beginning Tinsmithing

August 13-17 (5 days) :: Limit: 8 students :: Fee $460.00

Introduction to the art of tinning designed to provide a basic working knowledge of late 18th and early 19th century tinning tools, construction techniques and pattern layout. The history of American tinning is covered in an illustrated talk. Students construct 9 reproduction items including a one-pint mug, a wall sconce, and a coffee pot. All projects are based on traditional designs, using period tools and methods. All tools and tin are supplied for the workshop. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of tin ware and tools for examination, discussion and use.

William McMillen, Master Tinsmith, Glenmont NY.




9. A FIRST COURSE IN HEARTH COOKING

August 13-15 (3 days) :: Limit: 8 students :: Fee $350.00

Participants prepare ordinary meals from the late 18th and early 19th centuries on the wood-fired hearth. We consider the art of the cooking fire, and prepare typical meals using historical recipes and techniques, emphasizing seasonal availability of foodstuffs. We focus on the diet of ordinary people, exploring various period methods for baking, broiling, roasting, frying, and boiling. All ingredients are supplied -- participants will feast on their creations for breakfast, lunch, and supper.

Steve Frysinger has been cooking 18th and 19th century meals on the hearth for over 35 years and is a regular food-ways interpreter at the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton, VA.




10. TIN II – ADVANCED TINSMITHING

August 20-24 (5 days) :: Limit: 4 students :: Fee: $480.00

Designed for those who already have experience and a good basic knowledge of construction methods as well as the use of standard tin tools. Students have access to a large collection of tin sconces, lanterns, chandeliers, candle sticks, crooked spout coffee pots, roasting kitchens, etc. which they are invited to examine, measure and copy with the expert help of the instructor. All tools and tin are supplied for the workshop but participants are encouraged to bring examples of tin ware and tools for examination, discussion and use.

William McMillen, Master Tinsmith, Glenmont NY; Steve Delisle, Journeyman Tinsmith, Anderson Armory Tinshop, Colonial Williamsburg, VA.




11. TIN III – 18th – 19th CENTURY TINSMITHING

August 20-24 (5 days) :: Limit: 4 students :: Fee: $480.00

Designed for those who would like to produce tinware items in the 18th-century manner both civilian and military, using only hand tools and methods. Students are encouraged to produce patterns from many available documented 18th-century items. All tin and tools are provided. This workshop is held at the same time as TIN II.

William McMillen, Master Tinsmith, Glenmont NY; Steve Delisle, Journeyman Tinsmith, Anderson Armory Tinshop, Colonial Williamsburg, VA.




12. AT THE GEORGIAN DINNER TABLE

October 5-7 (3 days) :: Limit: 6 students :: Fee: $350.00

Working from various 18th and 19th century English and American cookery books, we utilize the hearth, brick wall oven and bake kettles, to prepare various meat and vegetable dishes, both sweet and savory puddings and pies, soups, and various baked goods.

Niel De Marino, is a renowned culinary historian who is at home in the 18th century. He is proprietor of "The Georgian Kitchen", a bakery specializing in period correct baked goods and food items.



PLEASE NOTE: Eastfield’s Annual Historical Ceramics Symposium (“Dish Camp”) is on hiatus this year, 2018. We will return with exciting discoveries and discussions in 2019!



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ABOUT THE WORKSHOPS AT EASTFIELD VILLAGE


For four decades, the Annual Series of Early American Trades and Historic Preservation Workshops has offered workshops and symposia in the traditional trades and domestic arts. The goal is to maintain the highest educational standards, with instructors who are leaders in their fields. The in-depth, hands-on workshops appeal to a wide range of students, including tradesmen, craftsmen, and museum personnel seeking to advance their knowledge and skills, as well as homeowners looking to deal with issues concerning historic home maintenance and restoration.

Preservation Laboratory - Eastfield Village is not a museum open to the public. Its creator, Donald Carpentier, assembled the more than twenty buildings and the thousands of architectural elements, tools and artifacts specifically to serve as a study collection. The Village itself is an educational tool. Combine this unique laboratory with gifted instructors who are eager to share their expertise and the result is a level of detail and depth to the courses that only Eastfield can offer.

Unique Experience - The lure of Eastfield is more than its exceptional curriculum. Students who take classes at the Village are encouraged to live there during their courses. Meals may be cooked in the late 18th century kitchens. Accommodations are rope beds with straw and feather ticks. Most evenings there are gatherings in the Briggs Tavern with lively conversations. This immersion experience offers an unforgettable opportunity to be with others - students and teachers - of similar interests, and to gain an appreciation for the work and daily life of pre-industrial America.

Lodging at Eastfield - Eastfield's taverns are available FREE OF CHARGE for those wishing to stay as our guests in early 19th century accommodations. The only requirement is that each person supply his/her own bedding plus 10 ten-inch white candles.

Eastfield Origins - Donald Carpentier moved his first building, a blacksmith's shop, into his father's "east field" in 1971. Over the years, he amassed a collection of buildings and artifacts and established the internationally known Workshops. The stated time period is 1787 – 1840 and all the buildings date from those years. They include a towering Greek Revival church, a thirteen room 18th century tavern and many smaller buildings devoted to the individual trades, including carpentry, tinsmithing, printing and shoemaking.

Historic Eastfield Foundation - Carpentier passed away from ALS in August of 2014, but his life work - Eastfield Village and the Workshops - continues under the aegis of the Historic Eastfield Foundation. Established by Don in 1990, the not-for-profit Foundation has as its mission "to continue the work of training men and women in a range of early American trades and historic preservation skills, and encouraging crafts persons and preservationists in their efforts to save the technology of the past.


Special Events and Tours

Eastfield's 4th Annual Founder's Day will be held on Saturday, September 22, 2018.


Once a year, Historic Eastfield is open to the general public, with craftspeople and interpreters bringing the Village to life with demonstrations and recreations of early American trades, culture and entertainment. Come celebrate the vision of Don Carpentier at this festive affair, the Foundation’s chief fund-raiser for the year.

The Village is also open by appointment for tour groups of 10 or more, and is available to rent for special events like weddings, meetings and parties. It may also be rented as a location for commercials and period films. Antiques and reproductions are available for sale in the E.A. Brown General Store by appointment.

Registration - Registration is on a "first come - first serve" basis. A non-refundable deposit of 50% of the tuition must accompany the registration and the remainder must be received by Eastfield no later than three (3) weeks prior to the commencement of the workshops, or the registrant will lose his/her space in class and deposit. No refunds will be given after six (6) weeks prior to that particular workshop. Eastfield reserves the right to cancel any workshop if minimum subscription levels are not met. In this case, a full refund is given. (Registrants from outside of the United States are asked not to send personal checks. Please send a cashier's check or money order in U.S. funds.)




To register,
Download this PDF Registration Form
and return it with payment to Eastfield Village.
(The form may be filled out on your computer, saved, and attached to this email: eastfieldvillage@gmail.com )

All payments may be made through PAYPAL
using the Eastfield email address eastfieldvillage@gmail.com


Eastfield Village is located in southern Rensselaer County, near the Massachusetts border. (Traveling directions will be sent upon receipt of your deposit.)