39th Annual Series of Early American Trades and Historic Preservation Workshops

 

Historic Preservation Workshops


 


 

Workshop image

Captured Light Photography

 

Workshop Schedule for 2014

 

1. TRADITIONAL PERIOD STONE MASONRY

 

June 6-7 (2 Days) :: $255.00 Fee :: Limit of 8 Students

 

This course is designed to teach the participants the basics of Period Stone Masonry. The topics will include the nature and composition of early stone walls, dry laid stone vs mortared walls, and hand tools used to cut and shape stones. There will be a short presentation showing historical styles of walls and pointing used on them. The class will spend time working on a small project to help aid in understanding the process. Instructor:Sam McKinney, independent scholar and operator of Traditional Builder, Dillsburg PA

 

2. OF PUDDINGS, CAKES, CREAMS, PYES, WHIPT SYLLABUBS & C.

 

June 6-8 (3 Days) :: $325.00 Fee :: Limit of 8 Students

 

The class will look at various 18th Century English cookery books-including those by Hannah Glasse , Elizabeth Raffald, Charles Carter, John Farley and John Nott. We shall prepare a selection of items baked in a brick wall oven and cast iron bake kettle. We will also make various other dessert items - creams, syllabubs, boiled puddings and assorted sweetmeats. Instructor: Niel De Marino is a renowned culinary historian who is at home in the 18th century. He researches and produces period correct foodstuffs based on original receipts. He has appeared in the PBS series American Experience in films titled “John & Abigail Adams” and “Alexander Hamilton”.

 

3. PERIOD MAKE-DO’S AND HOW TO REPRODUCE THEM

 

June 9-10 (2 Days) :: $325.00 Fee :: Limit of 10 Students

 

A Make-do was an expedient way to save a cherished, broken item for continued use in a household in Early America. They were made of wood, tin, iron and included items like a new handle on a teapot, a base for lamp, or even a wrought iron handle for a wooden plane. Today these items are highly collectable and of great interest for their ingenuity.

 

After an in-depth lecture on the range of diversity of items that were repaired by one of the country’s leading collectors of early make-do’s, the students will be introduced to a large variety of period make-do’s and the construction methods used to make them will be explained.

 

The participants will be asked to bring several special damaged items; plan several projects and spend the rest of the class working, with the help of the instructors to complete them. Participants will also be introduced to methods for aging the make-do so that it has the proper appearance of use and age.

Instructors: William Mc Millen, Olof Jansson, Don Carpentier, & Andrew Baseman of Past Imperfect

 

4. EARLY AMERICAN PRINTING

 

June 13-15 (3 Days) :: $325.00 Fee :: Limit of 8 Students

 

The invention of moveable type changed the world forever. At the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries the art of printing was entering a new phase. Many new designs for typefaces were being introduced in a cascade of styles that never had been seen before. New and faster presses were being built and printing took a bigger part in American’s daily lives than ever before.

 

This course will explain how the process worked from the making of type, setting up the type and printing on early hand presses. There will be a Columbian Press, two (2) Washington presses, an early table top wooden press and a battery of small hand presses for the class to use for printing. Instructors: Greg Joly of Bull Thistle Press and Ed Rayher of Swamp Press. Both are involved in the art of type founding.

 

5. EARLY AMERICAN GLASS & BOTTLES

 

June 20-22 (3 Days) :: $275.00 Fee :: No Limit

 

By the end of the 18th century American glass companies were springing up all over the east coast from the mid-Atlantic to New England. Some of these were primarily window glass houses, but they still would have made free hand items and usually junk bottles. Others were bottle production houses that made hundreds of thousands of bottles a years and employed hundreds of workmen. There were some factories that went into the pressing of glassware.

 

This program will take a look at some of these factories and chronicles their fascinating history and products. New information comes to light every year and we hear about recent discoveries about many factories. Lectures include:

 

"THE MANY MOLDS OF DR TOWNSENDS SARSAPARILLA" An in depth look into the early variants and history of the most "extraordinary medicine in the world" Rick Ciralli RCGLASS. Collector, dealer & scholar specializing in early bottles, flasks & blown glass.

 

"A FRESH LOOK: NEW DISCOVERIES FROM THE MOUNT VERNON GLASSWORKS (1810-1845)" Mark Yates, researcher and collector.

 

“THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE GRANGER FAMILY’S MT. PLEASANT GLASSWORKS AND THEIR LAST OPERATION KNOWN AS THE CONGRESSVILLE FACTORY IN SARATOGA” Richard Strunk, collector, historian & archeologist, Palatine Bridge NY.

 

“NEW HAMPSHIRE GLASS FROM THE ROBERT HEWES FACTORY IN TEMPLE (1780) RIGHT THROUGH TO CLOSING OF THE LYNDEBOROUGH FACTORY IN 1886”. Michael George, collector and independent scholar, New Boston NH.

 

“THE BERKSHIRE GLASS WORKS OF LANESBOROUGH, MA.” plus SAMPLER ON TILDEN AND SHAKER BOTTLES.Charlie Flint, collector, dealer, historian, Lenox MA.

 

“DR DYOTT, HIS GLASS FACTORIES AND HIS PATENT MEDICINES.” Stephen Atkinson, collector & independent scholar, South Jersey & Jerry Dauphinais collector, photographer & independent scholar, “THE UNITED GLASS COMPANY AT WISTARBURGH -- THE WISTAR FAMILY OF PHILADELPHIA AND SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY, THREE GLASS COMPANIES UNDER ONE ROOF”

 

“THE ALBANY GLASS COMPANY AND THE ALBANY GLASS WORKS OF DOWNTOWN ALBANY CITY”. Finally, the real story from recently discovered historic documents. This includes partial period client lists of the factories. Jason Privler & Don Carpentier, both collectors and independent scholars.

 

Albany NY There will be a tailgate bottle and glass sale for the participants and speakers during the seminar.

 

6. BRITISH & AMERICAN HISTORICAL CERAMICS “DISH CAMP”

 

June 27-29 (3 days) :: $395.00 Fee :: No Limit

 

We have two primary topics for the program. It’s been many years since we looked at the Hole House Wasters in Dish Camp and in that time many matches to the wasters have been made from US archaeological sites. The information from the tip has been helpful in answering many long-standing questions as to where these engine-turned dipped wares were made and how they were distributed. Debased scratch-blue stonewares figure in this as well as painted pearlwares. It’s time to put the pieces of this puzzle together and expand our knowledge of where these pots were used in America.

 

Don Carpentier, Jonathan Rickard, Barbara Magid of Historic Alexandria (Virginia) Archaeology, and Patricia Samford of the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab.

 

The second topic is gathering momentum as its importance is being realized by more museums and collectors. We now understand that the range of British-style earthenwares made in Philadelphia and New England in the early 19th century was substantial. Both redware and black glazed redware tea and coffee pots were being produced and sold in competition with the British imports. Some pots in Philadelphia were being engine turned. Recent findings expand their geography to Maryland and the Ohio River valley. We shall look at the shards, pots, sites and makers of these important pots.

 

Rick Hamelin, potter and researcher, Dave Graci, author and researcher, Brenda Hornsby-Heindl, potter, museum professional, and researcher, & Debbie Miller, archaeologist, National Park Service.

 

As a bonus, Joe Bagley, Boston MA City archaeologist will talk about The Archaeology of the Lost Charlestown MA Earthenware Industry.

 

There will be a dinner for the class participants in the Briggs Tavern on Saturday evening after the class.

 

Please note: HISTORICAL CERAMICS SYMPOSIUM is partially funded by the Historic Eastfield Foundation via the Echo Evetts fund.

 

7. FURNISHING THE HISTORIC HOUSE 1750-1850

 

August 1-3 (3 days) :: $375.00 Fee :: No Limit

 

Many museums and avid collectors are interested in furnishing their historic houses with period furnishings or good reproductions. It’s not always easy to get information on what various types of items are appropriate and where to find them.

 

Since the middle of the nineteenth century Americans have been trying to recreate the furnishings in historic buildings for exhibitions and celebrations. We often look back at these early attempts with amusement but, though we are better at it today, we still are trying to sort out many of the details that are involved. Many collectors or curators have preferences for certain objects and they seem to overload there. Today's state of the art furnishing plans are often rendered out of date by further research in following years.

 

In this workshop we will bring the participants up to date with current research about a variety of important subjects relating to period furnishings. We will look at various periods, locations, income levels, available technology, and available goods during the period. Lectures will include:

 

THE EVOLUTION OF EARLY LIGHTING AND APPROPRIATE LIGHTING FOR HISTORIC BUILDING/HOMES. Dan Mattausch, National Museum of American History, Washington DC

 

TEXTILES FOR HISTORIC HOUSES. Rabbit Goody: textile historian & owner of Thistle Hill Weavers, Cherry Valley NY

 

THE EVOLUTION OF PERIOD KITCHENS AND THEIR FURNISHINGS. Jon Maney, director of Hyde Hall & Jill Maney, independent scholar -- both from Cooperstown NY

 

A VISIT TO THE CHINA MERCHANT: POTTERY AND GLASS FOR THE HISTORIC HOUSE, 1750-1850. Amanda Lang, curatorial department chair & curator of historic interiors, Historic Deerfield Inc, Deerfield, MA.

 

There will be more lectures on a variety of topics, such as wallpaper & trim colors, ceramics & glass, artwork, using inventories to work by, and more. We’re still waiting for more information from the speakers. It will go on Don Carpentier’s wall on Facebook or at www.greatamericancraftsmen.org as soon as available.

 

8. TIN 1: BEGINNING TINSMITHING

 

August 4-8 (5 days) :: $440.00 Fee :: Limit of 8 Students

 

An introduction to the art of tinning designed to provide a basic working knowledge of late 18th & early 19th century tinning tools, construction techniques & pattern layout. The history of American tinning is covered. Students construct several pieces of tin ware based on traditional designs, using period tools & methods. All tools & tin are supplied for the workshop but participants are encouraged to bring examples of tin ware & tools for examination, discussion & use.

 

Instructor: William McMillen, Master Tinsmith, Glenmont NY

 

9. UNDER THE COVERS: BLANKETS, COVERLETS, AND COUNTERPANES

 

August 22-24 (3 Days) :: $195.00 Fee :: Limit of 20 Students

 

What could be found in American bedrooms from the middle of the 17th century through the middle of the 19th century? Early inventories list “coverlids,” “counterpins,” and the ever popular “green bed rug[s].” We know that elite households in Boston and Philadelphia had elaborate bed hangings with multiple layers, tassels, and trim. What about rural beds? Did they have hangings? What’s the difference between a coverlet and a counterpane? Were blankets ever intended to be top covers? How were regional, ethnic, or political differences expressed in early American bedrooms? How did styles evolve, and where did those styles come from?

 

Examining a variety of primary sources, including inventories, weavers’ drafts, newspaper advertisements, and surviving textiles, we will explore what Americans put on and draped over their beds, from early settlement through the 1850s. We’ll look at the extensive collections of Donald Carpentier and Rabbit Goody. We also encourage you to bring bedding textiles of your own to discuss -- favorites or mysteries -- as we build a fuller understanding of the styles and history of what Americans put on their beds.

 

Registration includes all materials and hand-outs.

 

Saturday night dinner at the tavern ($30.) Guests are welcome, please let us know the number of guests.

 

Instructors: Rabbit Goody, Textile Historian, Founder & Owner of Thistle Hill Weavers, & Jill Maney, Independent Scholar & Business Manager, Thistle Hill Weavers

 

To register for this program please PHONE 518-828-2729 or email rabbitgoodythw@gmail.com

 

10. TIN 2: ADVANCED TINSMITHING

 

August 25-29 (5 days) :: $475.00 Fee :: Limit of 8 Students

 

Course is designed for those who already have experience & a good basic knowledge of construction methods as well as the use of standard tin tools. Students have access to a large collection of tin sconces, lanterns, chandeliers, candle sticks, crooked spout coffee pots, roasting kitchens, etc. which they are invited to examine, measure & copy with the expert help of the instructor. All tools & tin are supplied for the workshop but participants are encouraged to bring examples of tin ware & tools for examination, discussion & use.

 

Instructor: William McMillen, Master Tinsmith, Glenmont NY

 

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About the Workshops at Eastfield Village

 

We continue to offer workshops & symposia in the traditional trades & domestic arts. Our goal is to maintain the highest educational standards. In these difficult financial times, it is important for many homeowners to be able to deal with the issues of historic home maintenance & restoration on their own without hiring contractors to do the work. Even for those who can afford to hire contractors, it is important that they be aware of the processes involved in the work to insure they are getting the highest quality workmanship on their projects.

 

There are a great number of research & restoration projects in the works at Eastfield & as usual, students may be involved in many phases of these projects.

 

Preservation Laboratory - Eastfield's collections are not available to the public. Workshop participants taking classes at the Village have access to more than twenty buildings & can study the collection of thousands of architectural elements & typical artifacts from the daily lives of early America.

 

In some courses students are involved in actual preservation work & have the experience of working first hand with the tools & materials of the trades being taught. The depth & detail of the courses are unique to Eastfield, since many of the courses are five days long. The emphasis is not only on lectures; many programs include extensive hands-on work. The craftsmen who teach these courses are available & happy to answer your specific questions & problems.

 

Unique experience - Students at Eastfield Village have come from as far as London & Alaska as well as from all over the U.S. & Canada. Museum professionals representing large institutions like Williamsburg, Cooperstown, Sturbridge, Upper Canada Village & numerous other restorations & museum facilities have also studied at the Village. The mixture of novices, whose interests are their own old houses, & museum professionals, who are looking to expand their specific skills, provides a dynamic opportunity to learn.

 

The lure of Eastfield is more than its curriculum. Students who take the classes at the Village are encouraged to live there during their courses. This offers a special opportunity to understand the daily lives & work of the tradesmen of the pre-industrial age. Meals may be cooked in the late-18th century kitchens. Accommodations are rope beds with straw & feather ticks. Eastfield offers an opportunity to be with others - students and teachers - of similar interests. Most evenings there are gatherings in the Briggs Tavern & lively conversations in front of a warm fireplace.

 

Eastfield Origins - Eastfield Village is home to its creator, Donald Carpentier & his family. He moved the first building, a blacksmith's shop, into his father's "east field" in 1971. In the years since, Don has amassed a collection of buildings & artifacts & established the nationally known Workshops. The stated time period is 1787 – 1840 & all the buildings date from those years. They include a towering Greek Revival church, a thirteen room 18th century tavern & many smaller buildings devoted to the individual trades, including carpentry, tinsmithing, printing & shoemaking.

 

Lodging at Eastfield Village - One of the most intriguing facets of Eastfield's workshops is the experience of living in the Village during the class. Eastfield's taverns are available FREE OF CHARGE for those wishing to stay as our guests in early 19th century accommodations. The only requirement is that each person choosing to stay at the taverns supply their own bedding plus 10 ten-inch white candles.

 

Tours & Special Events- Eastfield is now open, by appointment for tours by groups of 10 or more and available to rent for special events like weddings, meetings and parties. It may also be rented as a location for commercials and period films. Both antiques and reproductions are now for sale in the E. A. Brown General Store by appointment.

 

Eastfield is located in southern Rensselaer County, near the Massachusetts border.

 

Registration Information and Policy - Registration is on a "first come - first served" basis. A non-refundable deposit of 50% of the tuition must accompany the registration. The remainder must be received by Eastfield no later than three (3) weeks prior to the commencement of the workshop. Exact traveling directions will be mailed upon receipt of registration. No refunds will be given after three (3) weeks prior to that particular workshop. (Registrants from outside of the United States are asked not to send personal checks. Please send a cashier's check or money order in U.S. funds.

 

Registration Information Registration is on a "first come - first serve" basis. A non-refundable deposit of 50% of the tuition must accompany the registration and the remainder must be received by Eastfield no later than three (3) weeks prior to the commencement of the workshops, or the registrant will lose their space in class and their deposit. Exact traveling directions will be mailed upon receipt of your DEPOSIT. No refunds will be given after six(6) weeks prior to that particular workshop. Eastfield reserves the right to cancel any workshop if minimum subscription levels are not met. In this case, a full refund is given. (Registrants from outside of the United States are asked not to send personal checks. Please send a cashier's check or money order in U.S. funds.)

 

Payments may be made through PAYPAL using the Eastfield Email address. dcsapottery1@fairpoint.net

 

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